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(Hity of Wuxb^ov 


JON- WHtetto- oc 
w*<o* 



„«*»•«* °" ,c< 


A MESSAGE TO THE CITIZENS OF lur(OMBdi „ 9 ~f w«« 

1967 

" of 

c..y" «•*«- ne “j; p ;;; very dir « tl . n . «"*•*« ° nd 

diipoiol and treatment and ou b> „„ planned city with fullor 

— -*-• and notionol polici „. Ho :r ioko 

(n the long ton oot »— - ~ - * ‘ ^ 

zsz'jizss*. - - •»• - " •”■*'■ 


John WheeUon. Q. C - * 

M»y° r - 




CITY MANAGER 


CITIZENS OF WINDSOR: f . A . _ A . 

It is again my pleasure to report to you through the media of the Annuol Report on the 
accomplishments your Council, through its Administration, has achieved during the post 12 
months. Every effort has been made to provide again the maximum service required 
by our citizens at tho lowest possible cost to the taxpayer. 

Many motters which years ago soemod insurmountable are in the process of being attended 

to by this and future Councils, with the patient understanding of the citizens 

who are prepared to striko a balance between the desire and need for additional services and 
the provision of funds through the toxes to provide them. 

The following arc but a few of the many important matters being attended to at this time: 

1. Approved functional report and the general alignment of the E. C. Row Expressway 

which when completed will provide a four-lane expresswav through the southerly part of the 
City extending from Highway 18 on the west to Highway 39 on the east. 

2. Commenced the construction of the Little River Trunk Sanitary Sewer leading from the 
Little River Sewage Treatment Plant to lands south of Tecumseh Road, 

this being only the first stage of a program to open up this area for housing development 
so desperately required in the City. 

3. Completion of the equalization of assessments bv June, 1968 in Words 6, 7 and 8, 
thereby enabling all areas of the City to be on tho same basis of assessment. 

4. Continuotion of work on the construction of the west end Sewage Treatment Plant, the Caron 
Avenue Pumping Station and the Riverfront Interceptor Sewer, all af which arc 

scheduled for completion ?n 1969, thereby enabling sewage from the core City to be 
directed for treatment before discharge into the Detroit River. 

5. Improvements to our porks and playgrounds to ensure full and adequate utilization 
of these facilities by all citizens of the City. 

6. Continuous efforts »o maintain, rebuild and reconstruct our City streets within the allocation 
of funds provided for this purpose. 

As you can see from the above, a busy year and one of substantial accomplishments and 
progress has passed. The year 1968 promises to be equally hectic and perhaps 
more demonding in scope. 

The objectives of the City Council ond its endeavours to continue tho progress ond plonning 
of our City affairs requires the faithful support of all our citizens. 

This report will, I hope, provide much of interest for all Windsor citizens since 
an informed public is essential to good government. 

I express my thanks to tho City Council, the civic officials and tho Press and Radio 

for the friendly spirit of co-operation and understanding of the numerous problems wo face. 

This attitude ond teamwork has mode our success possible. 

CITY MANAGER 


COVER PICTURES — 

Description of these Centennial Year events will be found on page 11. 




The 1968 City Council took over City Government on January 1st. It is elected for 
a two year term. In the picture, from left to right ore — (back row) Aid. Roy J. 
Moore, Aid. Roy A. Bottagello, Aid. Frank Wansbrough, Aid. Huntley J. Farrow, 
Aid. Anthony Soda, Aid. Thomas S. Toth, (front row) Aid. William C. Riggs, Mayor 
John Wheelton, Q.C., Aid. Albert H. Weeks. 

3 




YOUR CITY COUNCIL 


City Departments directly responsible to City Council through the City Man- 
ager are: Assessment, Building, City Clerk's, Legal, Parks and Recreation, 
Personnel, Planning ond Urban Renewal, Property and Market, Public Works, 
Purchasing, Finance, Emergency Measures Organization, Fire, Social Services, 
Research and Information, Traffic Engineering and Huron Lodge. Pictured at 
the left is the 1967 Council. Left to right, top row — Mayor John Wheelton, 
Q.C., Aid. Mrs. C. H. Montrose, Aid. R. A. Battagello, middle row — Aid. 
W. C. Riggs, Aid. R. J. Moore, Aid. R. Perry, D. D. S., bottom row — the late 
Aid. J. P. Morand, Aid. L. J. Parent, Aid. A. H. Weeks. 


In January of 1967, the Finance Department began 
using a computer to help speed up the preparation of 
the following: Payroll cheques for the 1 ,900 city em- 
ployees, Accounts Payable cheques. General Ledger 
postings. Budgetary Accounting statements for manage- 
ment, Bank Reconciliation statements, T-4 slips and 
Unemployment Insurance forms and Election results* 

During the year, conversion of assessment records to 
electronic data processing was begun* 1 968 Assessment 
notices and rolls were prepared by computer for the 
first time. Many other applications are planned far the 
future, including: police accident reporting, property tax 
notices, welfare cheques and voters lists. 


HERE’S WHERE 


FINANCIAL REPORT FOR 1967 

S HOW IT WAS PUT TO USE . . 

EXPENDITURES 


Education 


$14,131,461* 


Public Works, Roads, Sanitation, 
Garbage and Rubbish Disposal 


4,315,414. 


General Government 


3,802,120. 


% 


34.74 


10*61 


9.35 


THE MONEY GAME FROM 





REVENUES 

AMOUNT 

% 

Police 

2,966,824. 

7.29 


Revenues from taxation 

$31,762,061. 

78.07 

Fire 

/'kiL „ „ D., lAn 6.*% Partnnc r“i H 

1,856,545. 

4*56 


Contributions, Grants, Subsidies 

t s4n 6io 

8.75 

Other rroreciion to rersans unu 

Property, Law Enforcement, 
Streetlighting, etc* 

1,732,998, 

4.26 


and Tax Equivalents 

Licenses and Permits 

JUU f U^Vi 

626,362. 

1.54 

Social Welfare and Child 

Assistance 

2,490,701. 

6.12 


Fines and Fees 

565,607. 

1*39 

Parks, Recreation and Community 
Services 

1,815,732. 

4*46 





Conservation of Health 

1,253,457. 

3.08 


Debenture Debt Charges 
Recoverable 

Othp-f 

1,960,206, 

1,118,367. 

4.82 

2.75 

Debt Charges 

4,994,863. 

12*28 




Provision for Reserves 

466,766. 

1*15 

* 

Surplus from 1966 Operations 

1,089,419. 

2*68 

Other 

855,771. 

2.10 


TOTAL REVENUES 

$40,682,652. 

1 00*00 


$40,682,652. 

100.00 



-i 


— 



WINDSOR IN THE YEAR 


WILL HAVE A POPULATION OF 303,000 

(58% MORE THAN NOW) 


WE WILL HAVE 94,000 DWELLING UNITS 

(74% MORE THAN NOW) 


132,000 PERSONS WILL BE EMPLOYED 

{48% MORE THAN NOW) 


WE WILL HAVE 56,850 ELEMENTARY SCHOOL PUPILS 

(47% MORE THAN NOW) 


SECONDARY SCHOOL STUDENTS WILL NUMBER 21,200 

(59% MORE THAN NOW) 


33,000 OF OUR CITIZENS WILL BE 65 AND OVER 

(80% MORE THAN NOW) 

These, and many other interesting figures are projections 
made os part of a 20-year plan for the Windsor area. 


"vfe 


By studying past trends and making projections for the future (such as the figures 
shown above) your Department of Planning and Urban Renewal is able to 
foresee the future needs of the community and make plans for them to be 
carried out in on orderly manner. A Master Plan co-ordinating all known future 
requirements is now being prepared by the professional planning staff of this 
department. 




WIND 


Public Schools**^* 


Nof only pupils, but teachers too, 
must do their homework. To help 
them keep up on the newest methods 
of teaching ond to provide them 
with instructional materials, such os 
reference books and a whole range 
of “non book " or audio-visual olds, 
Windsor's Educational Resource Cen- 
tre was set up. The Centre serves 
41 public schools and 12 secondary 
schools with a total of 31 <500 pupils- 






SOR’S EDUCATIONAL S 


The Centre occupies a building which 
was formerly used to store school 
supplies- Renovation changed it into 
a bright, pleasant instructional ma- 
terials centre. Since its opening, late 
in '67, several hundred teachers each 
month have used it for working on 
teaching aids, viewing films they 
will use for instruction — or, making 
use of its many other facilities which 
will help make them more effective 
teachers. 


Separate 

Schools 


Fifty-two schools and 20,600 pupils 
make up the Elementary branch of 
the Separate School System, At the 
Secondary School level, about 3,000 
students attend Assumption, Brennan 
and St, Mary's Academy Calhallc 
High Schools. Teaching methods are 
continually changing. Far example, 
the youngsters here are working on 
a problem in mathematics. The ab- 
sence of pressure or “competition" 
atlows the group to arrive at a 
solution based on information pre- 
viously taught. 


Pictured above are two of the kinds of aids the teachers are able 
to make at the Centre. Top, these youngsters are “teaching'' them- 
selves the basics of mathematics. Bottom, current events suddenly 
take on a new interest when the pupils con take an active part in 
explaining them to the class and to each other. 

6 


The Church changes — and, as we see here, so da the methods of teaching 
its doctrine. The Windsor Separate Schools employ four religion consultants 
to direct and update their religion program. They direct workshops for 
schools piloting new programs, and hold numerous grade meetings to 
acquaint teachers with the real meaning of religion and to demonstrate 
effective teaching aids. 





Vocational 

Schools 


Vocational Schools offer a wide 
variety of courses which help 
young men and young women be- 
come proficient In the skill or 
trade of their choice. Shops are 
equipped with modern powered 
machinery — usually of the same 
type the student will encounter ''on 
the job". These young men are 
perfecting their skills In the Car- 
pentry Shop. 



Merchandising courses provide realistic experience for those preparing for a career In 
Marketing* Merchandising rooms are like small stores, os this one at William Hands 
Jr* Vocational School* Retail sales are mode by pupil salesmen to other pupils ond 
teachers. Regular accounts ore kept and business services practiced. 


Adult Education 


Interest in Adult Education has 
increased tremendously in the 
past five years. In 1962, just 
over 2,500 were attending 
Adult Evening Classes — 1967 
saw this figure increase to a I 
most 6,400. Added to this were 
over 6,000 others in the fallow- 
ing categories: retraining cm 
ployed — — 1 10, retraining in 
co-operation with Industry — 
2,018, retraining unemployed 
— -3,132, retraining far disabled 
— 4, testing and counselling 
for the general public — 80). 
So, in 1967, the total attending 
Adult Evening classes or mak- 
ing use of the Adult Education 
Division's facilities was 12,423. 



The group in the top picture "going back to school" 
ore studying Shorthand. They attended class two even- 
ings per week for a total of 96 hours. Course was 
taken by those looking for employment as well os some 
taking a refresher course* In the lower picture, '"Miss 
Woodworker of 1967'' is the only woman enrolled in 
the Carpentry Class at Lowe Tech* The course lasted 
9G hours and a total of 22 were enrolled. 




7 





EDUCATION (continued) 


Until construction ts completed on the 95 acre campus (Huron 
Line ond Causineao), cfasses are beEd ot three locations* 
- 1 1 0 m! Technical Divisions at B 1 5 Mercer, Business and 

the new campus. Architectural Technology and 
Administrative Offices at 6QQ Ouellette Ave, 


Teachers' College, 600 Third Concession, is operated entirely 
by the Ontario Department of Education and is not a 
direct charge to Windsor taxpayers. 


WINDSOR TEACHERS' COLLEGE 


ST. CLAIR COLLEGE 


Enrolment is 300 — many From out of town. All salaries 
and expenses are paid by the Ontario Government, which 
means hundreds of thousands of extra dollars for this atta- 


in learning Science, the "discovery" method is used. Pro* 
jpedive teachers search far the answers rather than 
memorise pages of facts. 


Here are only two of the many courses offered at St. Clair 
College, Above, Secretarial Science and Arts, Below, Electronics 
at the Technology Division, 615 Mercer Sh 


UNIVERSITY OF WINDSOR 




an 


Closed-circuit TV — - on effective new teaching 
technique is widely used on campus* 



Modem laboratory facilities are available for 
teaching and research in science and engineering. 




The University of Windsor continues its steady 
growth. Present enrolment 3,342 — projected 
for 1970, five thousand. The most recently coni' 
pieted building is a centre for the School of 
Physical and Health Education. Now under con- 
struction are: a residence, student centre and 
dining facility and ti building to house the 
recently established faculty of Law. 






B 


EH 



fho City Playgrounds offer a wide 
roriety of creative and exciting sports 
md activities. Each location is super* 
ised by trained and qualified instruc- 
ts during the eight week period of 
!vly and August. Programs consist of 
|omes, crafts, nature study, music and 
ports of interest to boys and girls 
rom 5 to 15. 


t 


ARKS and RECREATION 





I 

J 

E* 



The now Centennial Park was dedicated in July 1967. It 
is located along the riverfront from Caron Ave. to Bridge 
Ave. A time capsule to be opened in 2067 is buried 
under the Century Rock. In it are documents about the 
pork boing dedicated as a Centennial project, a letter 
from the Mayor, the day's newspaper and a Canadian 
Flog. 


KEEP THE INFORMATION PRINTED HERE IN A HANDY 
PLACE AND MAKE SURE YOU GET THE MOST OUT OF 
YOUR PARKS AND PLAYGROUNDS. 


VISIT THE SUPERVISED PLAYGROUND CLOSEST TO YOUR HOME 

— Assumption, Centonniol, Dieppe. Rcaume, Alexander. 
c MAR,NA 7* McKee (foot of Che wit! and Sandwich Streets). 

PICNIC AREAS Mic Mac (44*/2 acres), Memorial (4234 acres), Jackson (60 acres) Oiihwov non > 

PERMITS ARE REQUIRED FOR PICNICS, LEAGUE SPORTS, PARADES, PATRIOTIC AND RELIGIOUS CEREMONIES 


SWIMMING 


INSTRUCTION AND GENERAL SWIMMING ARE AVAILABLE THROUGHOUT THE YEAR AT THE FOLLOWING POOLS- 

OUTDOOR POOLS INDOOR POOLS 


ROTARY — Mic Mac Park. 1125 Prince Road 
ROTARY — E. Atkinson Park, 1981 Riverside Dr. W 
LIONS — Lanspeary Park, 1240 Langlois Avenue 
CENTRAL — Woodland and Norfolk 
REMINGTON PARK — Edinborough and Lillian 
RIVERSIDE CENTENNIAL — 6755 Wyandotte St. E. 


J. L. FORSTER COLLEGIATE — 749 Felix Avenue 
W F. HERMAN COLLEGIATE — 1930 Rossini Blvd. 

W. C. KENNEDY COLLEGIATE — 245 Tecumsch Rd. E. 
J. C. PATTERSON COLLEGIATE — 151 Elliott St. E. 
RIVERSIDE HIGH SCHOOL — 8465 Jerome S*. 
WALKERVILLE COLLEGIATE - 2100 Richmond St. 

V. MASSEY COLLEGIATE — 1800 Liberty St. 
QUALIFYING COURSES FOR CERTIFICATION. OF INSTRUCTORS AND LEADERS ARE HELD EACH YEAR 


LOCATION OF YOUR COMMUNITY CENTRES 

A.K.O. COMMUNITY CENTRE — 4270 Alice St. 

F. W. BEGLEY SCHOOL COMMUNITY CENTRE — 1093 Assumption St. 

MARLBOROUGH COMMUNITY CENTRE — 3557 Melbourne St. 

PARENT AVENUE COMMUNITY CENTRE — 2305 Porent Ave. 

REMINGTON PARK COMMUNITY CENTRE — Edinborough ot Lillian 
RIVERSIDE RECREATION & MEMORIAL CENTRE — 6755 Wyandotte St. E. 

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT DEPT. OF PARKS AND RECREATION, PHONE 254-1611 EXTENSION 276 


9 


PUBLIC LIBRARY 


One In every three Windsor citizen* hold* 
□ Library Card end borrows books. Thou- 
sands of others visit the Library Branches 
for research or moke use of its services 
by telephone. 

Special events ore often highlighted ■— 
these youngsters show keen Interest in 
Young Canada's Book Week — « Centen- 
nial Theme. 




Many organizations borrow 
Topical Films from the 
Library* Willisteod Branch 
hos a well stocked film 
library and is the film 
centre for ihe Southwestern 
Region of Ontario. 


Music is always popular 
— * especially with young 
people. These lads are us- 
ing the listening facilities 
at the Seminole Branch. 
Note the use of earphones 
so others ore not disturbed 



ID 


TRAFFIC 

ENGINEERING DEPT. 





il 'S? 


Forking enforcement is now 
the responsibility of the 
Traffic Engineering Deport- 
ment. The pretty "meter 
maids" who operate these 
vehicles have been trained 
in: traffic problems, meter 
operation* mop reading 
and public relations. 



Traffic lane lines and crass walks on the streets are there to aid the flaw of traffic OTVC * * P f 
protect bath drivers and pedestrians. This new* truck-mounted striper holds 150 9° ° 
special paint and lays down three stripes at the some time. 


m 


Wfi^t 
indui 
t rives 

Hows 

operc 

operc 

irtspe 

police 

chock 

truck; 

vehicl 


After 

Police 

mentj 

1*797 

perma 



CENTENNIAL YEAR 
IN WINDSOR 


PROTECTION "ROUND THE CLOCK 9 ’ 



Mmt citizens are aware of the regular duties of the polke, 
including: protection of citizens and property, traffic control, 
investigation of accidents and crimes. 

However, once a year, our Police Department in co- 
operation with the Ontario Department of Transport 
operates the "mobile safety check lone". Originally these 
inspections were on o voluntary basis but since 1966 the 
police officers have selected the vehicles which are to be 
checked. This has resulted in fewer vehicles (both cars and 
trucks) checked but police are now able to concentrate on 
vehicles which look unfit for the road. 




FIRE DEPARTMENT 
AND E.M.O. 


In 1967 the Fire Deportment answered 2,572 alarms 
(385 of them folse}. They travelled 24,174 miles — a 
distance almost equal to once around the world* Fire- 
men spent almost 6,000 hours at fires which caused a 
total loss of about million. 



All of this activity was carried 
out at a per capita cast of only 
2.6c per day , 

The Emergency Measures Or- 
ganization works closely with 
the Windsor Police and Fire 
Deportments. Through them, 
they are able to moke imme- 
diate radio contact with all Fire 
Departments in the county. 


This 100' aerial ladder is hy- 
draulically operated and is the 
latest piece of major equipment 
to be added to the fleet. It is 
used for both rescue and fire* 
fighting. 


Below is the firefighting and 
rescue boat acquired in 1967, 
Its fop speed, fully equipped 
is 35 m.p.h. 


During Canada's Centennial Year — 1967 — many 
exciting activities took place. On the cover ore 
shown just five of these. The city's special Centennial 
Project was the beautiful Centennial Park pictured 
on page 9. 


COVER PICTURE DETAILS 

THE GOLDEN CENTENNA1RE5 

Many thousands watched in awe as these skilled 
pilots put their planes through almost impossible 
manoeuvres. This thrilling exhibition took place on 
Sunday May 7th. 

R M S. HAMPSHIRE 

From June 12th to 15th the public was able to get 
a close look at the H* M. 5. Hampshire. For two of 
these days the public was permitted aboard from 
2 p.m. to & p.m. 

TEEN SCENE WEEK — JULY 23 - 29 

Our young people organized a greet I program for 
this week* Events included an outdoor church service, 
car rally, street dance, fashion show, beauty contest 
and many others. The "Picassos" 1 are pictured on 
the cover, 

THE CONFEDERATION TRAIN 

76,223 people, young and old, vlsiled the many 
wonderful displays in the train's 6 air conditioned 
coaches during its Windsor stay — June 16th * 23rd. 



"FRIENDSHIP" SERVICE, ST* PAUL'S, DETROIT 

On June 4th, the Essex and Kent Scottish Regiment, 
the veterans of the Second World War — and 
friends on both sides of the border attended St* 
Paul's Cathedral for the Canadian-Amerlcon Friend* 
ship Service. 



AUDITORIUM 


iiiH 


I M Jj 


IIIIIIIIH 11 * 11 








Almost eight years ago, the Cleary Auditorium was completed. Besides being a popular cultural 
centre for our citizens, it has brought hundreds of thousands of convention dollars to Windsor. 
In 1967 a wide variety of activities took place at Cleary. 

PURCHASING DEPT. 


The function of the Purchasing De- 
partment is to obtain maximum 
value consistent with satisfactory 
quality, delivery and service. 

By centralizing the requirements of 
all city departments, it is possible 
to obtain the best quantity dis- 
counts and has proved to be an 
excellent method of obtaining 
maximum value for the tax dollar. 
Competitive bidding is encouraged 
by extending to vendors the op- 
portunity of tendering on municipal 
requirements, and all awards are 
made in strict compliance with 
12 


specifications. 

The department is constantly in- 
vestigating new sources of supply 
and applying the principles of 
Value Analysis on various items 
of equipment and services as the 
occasion arises. 

Windsor's Purchasing Department 
is a member of, and subscribes to 
the ethics and standards of the 
Canadian Association of Purchas- 
ing Agents, and the Municipal 
Purchasers 7 Ontario Chapter of 
Purchasing Agents. 


RESEARCH DEPT. 


This department is fairly new — 
being set up about the time of 
annexation, January 1966. At 
that time, it was quite apparent 
that with the larger city, nu- 
merous and different problems 
would arise. With this in mind, 
City Council decided to set up a 
department which could act as 
a "clearing house 77 for these pro- 
blems and also to act as a 
liaison between the various city 
departments. 

On many occasions, the Research 
Department will consult with 
various municipalities in 
Ontario, as well as comparable 


municipalities in the United 
States. After gathering as much 
information as possible from 
these sources, the Research De- 
partment makes a report to the 
City Manager, who in turn sub- 
mits it to City Council. 

The department also acts as 
liaison between City Council, the 
Emergency Housing Committee 
of Council, and the agencies of 
the Federal and Provincial Go- 
vernments designated to provide 
public housing for both Senior 
Citizens and families who find 
it difficult to obtain suitable 
living accommodations in this 
rapidly expanding city. 


HURON LODGE 



With the addition to Huron Lodge now completed, the Home accommodates 260 people. 
Comfortable bedrooms, spacious dining rooms and recreation rooms (see picture) hove 
been provided. Facilities for outdoor activities will be completed this year. Windsor can 
be extremely proud of this Home for the Aged. It is second to none in Ontario. 



PUBLIC HEALTH DEPT 


The Metro Windsor-Essex County Health Unit had 
much to report for 1967. During the year advances 
were made in control of water pollution, air pol- 
lution, waste disposal, nursing home legislation, 
mental health and home care programs, tuberculosis 
control, dental health education, poison control and 
sex education in schools. The Health Unit also 
made provisions for the distribution, to school pupils, 
of literature and films on venereal disease and the 
hazards of smoking to health. 


In 1968, it is planned to extend clinic services in 
several new fields, such as: family planning, geria 
tries and measles immunization on a community-wide 
basis. 

A mumps vaccine is now available and since mumps 
was the major communicable disease in '67, it is 
hoped that the Federal Government will approve 
if for general use in the coming year. 


The youngsters here are 
among the first in the city 
to be vaccinated against 
measles. Dr. Howie, Medi- 
cal Officer of Health is 
giving the "shot". 




The new Public Health 
Laboratory on Huron Line 
at Liberty (previously lo- 
cated in the Board of 
Health Bldg.). Operational 
costs of this lab. are 
borne by the Ontario 
Government but its con- 
venient location allows 
Windsor to take full ad- 
vantage of its services. 


DEPARTMENT OF BUILDINGS 

BUILDING PERMITS AND HOW TO OBTAIN THEM 

All Permit Applications, Construction and Zoning Information 
can be obtained from the Department of Buildings 
4th. floor, City Hall 
Phone 254-1611, extensions 265-6 7-8 

Permits are required to alter, removo or demolish any building. 

Application for a Permit shall be submitted to the Building Commissioner on 
forms available at the Building Dept. Information on the forms must include: 

(A) A general description of the proposed work. 

(B) The lot and registered plan or a description of the lands upon which the 
work is to be carried out. 

(C) The proposed use or occupancy of all parts of the building and the use of 
such portions of the site not covered by the building. 

The Applicant for a Permit shall also submit to the Building Commissioner: 

(D) Two copies of Plans and Specifications for the proposed work. Plans must 
be drawn to scale ond clearly marked with the Lot and Plan Numbers of 
the site or street numbers. The name and address of ihe owner of the build- 
ing and the person who prepared the Plan must also be shown. 

(E) A Plan showing to scale the sizes and locations of the proposed construction, 
existing buildings on the site, their distances from lot lines and the estab- 
lished street grades. The Building Commissioner may require a Plan of 
Survey certified by an Ontario Land Surveyor showing all street, lane, 
building and property lines. In the case of demolitions, the site Plans must 
show the buildings to be demolished and the location and size of buildings 
that are to remain. 

Demolition and Removal: 

Excerpts from Section 9, By-Law No. 2490 

No person shall remove any building or structure within the limits of the City 
of Windsor without permission of the Council of the Corporation and all ap- 
plications to Council for permission to move any building or structure (except a 
one or two-car garage) shall be made in writing and shall include the following: 

1. Location of the building proposed to be moved . 

2. Location to which such building is to be moved. 

3. Dimensions of the building. 

4. Photographs of the building. 

5. Photographs showing buildings adjacent to the new location. 

6. A Plot Plan showing the proposed new location of the building. 

ZONING BY-LAW 

Prior to the issuance of any Building Permit the Zoning Regulations of the City 
of Windsor must be complied with. In some cases (especially when additions 
are contemplated to existing buildings) the requirements of the Zoning By-Law 
are difficult to maintain and minor variances are sometimes warranted. For this 
purpose, under section 32B of the Planning Act. the Zoning Committee of Ad- 
justment may grant relief from the requirements of the By-Law. Applications 
for the minor relief from the regulations of the Zoning By-Law must be made 
to the Secretary of the Zoning Committee of Adjustment, Dept, of Planning and 
Urban Renewal — 3r<f. floor. City Hall, phone 254-1611, ext. 281-2-3. 


13 



Remember? Snow plowing 
ope rollons such os this 
ore started on main arte- 
ries after an accumulation 
of 3" and still falling. 
Complete plowing of p\\ 
streets is undertaken if 
accumulation is 6" or more 
— . this is considered an 
emergency. 


PUBLIC WORKS DEPT. 


M 


This is the partially completed wet well for the West Windsor Sewage Treatment 
Installation, It is 5V deep and when completed will handle about 24,000,000 
gallons per doy, This volume will gradually be increased to 60,000,000 gallons. 


WINDSOR UTILITIES COMMISSION 


This is o new concept in 
substation design. Two of 
these are being built — 
one near Devon Park and 
the other near Huron Line 
Industrial Pork. Each sub- 
station wilt hove the Ca- 
pacity to take care of 
20,000 people. 




The high capacity watermain building program is going forward as 
scheduled. Here we see a portion of the 24" line under construction 
south on Huron Line from College Avenue to Tecumseh Read. When 
completed it will provide better service to the southwest section of 
the city. 



Devon Pork, a pri- 
vately developed 100 
acre industrial area. 
Less than 20 acres re- 
main to be occupied. 
Two similar develop- 
ments are planned 
for the city's east 
and west sides. 







GREATER WINDSOR 

INDUSTRIAL COMMISSION 


Selling Windsor as a manufacturing lo- 
cation ij tho aim of The Greater Windsor 
Industrial Commission. This involves track- 
ing down prospects throughout North 
America and elsewhere and presenting 
Windsor's story . . . keeping in touch 
with other business and industrial de- 
velopers and maintaining close contact 
with community leaders. Other activities 
include gathering and disseminating sta- 
tistics, researching problems facing the 
manufacturing community and working 
toward a better environment for industry. 
The end result is, of course, to promoto 
the growth and prosperity of Windsor. 


M.G.M. Brakes, Conada, Ltd. is the largest 
new industry to establish in Windsor in 
1967. They occupy 22,000 sq. ft. and em- 
ploy 25. Truck Brakes are their specialty. 


Chrysler's main plant and head 
office from the air. The high 
section is a $10 million ad- 
dition to the assembly plant 
— completed in '67. 


The Assessment Department is responsible for evaluating 
all properties in the City. From these evaluations, pro- 
perty taxes are levied. Taxpayers who feel their 
assessment is excessive may appeal to the Court of 
Revision. Homeowners should know that maintenance 
sustains assessed value — it does not raise itl 


THESE REPAIRS AND IMPROVEMENTS CAN BE MADE WITH- 
OUT INCREASING ASSESSMENT IF THEY ARE NOT PART OF 
A COMPLETE MODERNIZATION PROGRAM. 

Interior . . . 

ADDITIONAL ELECTRICAL CIRCUITS 
ADDITIONAL ELECTRICAL OUTLETS 
COMPLETE REWIRING 
REPAIRS TO PLASTER 
REDECORATING AND PAINTING 
ADDITIONAL CLOSETS 

REMOVAL OF PARTITIONS TO ENLARGE ROOMS 
REMOVAL OF "DATED" WOOD 
REPLACEMENT OF DOORS 

REPLACEMENT OF OIL OR GAS BURNER IN EXISTING FURNACE 
REPAIRS OF PLUMBING FIXTURES 

Exterior ... 

PAINTING 

REMOVAL OF DILAPIDATED SHED OR GARAGE 
REMOVAL OF UNUSED PORCH 
REMOVAL OF "DATED" EXTERIOR TRIM 
REPOINTING, REPAIRING OR REPLACEMENT OF EXISTING 
MASONRY 

REPAIR OR REPLACEMENT OF ROOF 
ADDITION OR REPLACEMENT OF EAVESTROUGHING OR 
DOWNSPOUTS 

REPLACEMENT OF DOORS AND WINDOWS 
ADDITION OF STORM DOORS AND WEATHERSTRIPPING 
ADDITION OF AWNINGS 

Landscaping . . . 

FENCES AND HEDGES 
SIDEWALKS AND DRIVES 
OUTDOOR LIGHTS 
LAWN SPRINKLING SYSTEMS 


It pays to Maintain and Repair your home ... If you have a 

question, visit the Assessment Deportment or phone 254-1611. 


15 


DIRECTORY 


OF MUNICIPAL SERVICES 


City Manoger WcM 

Building! Department - ^ lt Y 

Assessment Department City Hall 

City Hall * 

City Clerk Cit * Hdl w ' 

Auditorium arid Convention Hall 201 Riversrde Drive West 


DRIVEWAYS, STREET OPENINGS, HOARDING & MOVING PERMITS Public Works Deportment City Hall 


administration 
AIR POLLUTION 

ASSESSMENTS gl| v ~ : ^ „ -(Ji ^ * . 

BUILDING, PLUMBING, HEATING PERMITS & INSPECTIONS Build.ng Department 

CITY CLERK 

CLEARY AUDITORIUM 

~^ENING5, HUAKPirsu * myvinvj rLnm.i« ^ _r A . . 7!1 n(m iu fte Avenue 

EMERGENCY MEASURES ORGANIZATION Emergency Meagre , Orgomxab^ . ■■ ™ 

EMPLOYMENT end ToSy" Court Deportment 586 Ouellette Avenue 

police Deportment *** City Hell Square 

Fire Deportment 254 Pitt Street East 

Huron Lodge ’ 475 Huron J L!ne w 

Commission Office 500 «*•««»• Drive West 

Legal Department . City Hall 


254*1 dll 
254-161 1 
254 - 1 * 1 1 
254-1611 
254-1611 
252-8311 
254-161 1 
254-6471 
254-1611 


FAMILY COURT - — 

FINES, PARKING & TRAFFIC 

FIRE * t- - * ■ 

HOME FOR THE AGED 

INDUSTRIAL COMMISSION - 

LEGAL 

LICENSES: BUSINESS, DOG, HAWKERS, MARRIAGE, TAXI, 
PLUMBERS, ELECTRICIANS 
LIGHT & WATER 

MARKET 

METRO WINDSOR-ESSEX COUNTY HEALTH UNIT 
PARKS, PICNIC PERMITS, ETC. 

PLANNING & URBAN RENEWAL 

POLICE ■■■ 

PROPERTY, LAND SALES 
PUBLIC SCHOOLS 
PURCHASING 
RECREATION PROGRAMS 

REDEVELOPMENT 

REFUSE COLLECTION 
RESEARCH 

SENIOR CITIZENS HOUSING 
SEPARATE SCHOOLS . 

SEWERS & STREET MAINTENANCE, ETC. 

SEWER BLOCKAGE & TREE ROOTS 

STREET NAME SIGNS 

TAXES — TREASURY, ACCOUNTING & FINANCE 
TRAFFIC LIGHTS & SIGNS 


253- 4211 

254- 2381 
252-5747 
256-2697 
254-1611 


Clerk's Department — 

... Utilities Commission ............. 

..... Public Market 

Metropolitan Health Building 
Parks and Recreation Deportment 
Planning Department 

Police Department 

Property Department 
Administrative Offices 
Purchasing Deportment 
Parks and Recreation Department 
Planning Department 
public Works Refuse Division 


254-1611 


... City Hall ■->. — 

787 Ouellette Avenue 254-1692 

195 McDougal! Street 253-2686 

2090 Wyandotte Street East 256-3416 

63 Chatham Street East 254-161 1 

. City Hall 254 'f 1 

,135 Park St reel East - 253-4211 

, 63 Chatham Street East 
451 Park Street West 

City Hall 

63 Chatham Street East 
City Hall ... 

.... 1531 Crawford Avenue 


WELFARE 1 - ^ 

ZONING COMMITTEE OF ADJUSTMENT Pkmmng Deportment 

ZONING INFORMATION 


254-1611 

253- 4291 
254 1 6U 
254 1611 

254- 1611 
252-4487 

- v u .* 254-1611 

Research Department City Hall 254 1611 

Property Department 6* Chatham Street Ea.t 1M1 

Administrative Often Tusearara Street 

Public Works Maintenance Division 1531 Crawford Avenue _ _ 

. , , Public Works Department 1531 Crawford Avenue 

Utilities Commission - - 787 Ouellette Avenue 

Finance Department -City Hall 

Traffic Engineering Department City Hall 

Social Service Department 755 Louis Avenue 

„ t ,City Hall ■■■■-* -■■■■■- 

Building Department . City Hall +.*. * 


254-1611 

254-1611 

253- 6345 

254- 1611 
254 161 1 


PUBLICATION COMMITTEE 


A, P. Angus 


R. D, Chappell, Chairman 
G. C Pastortus 


E, A. Noakes